Tag Archives: makers

Interview with Barbara Borchardt of ILiveInEastVan

LinkedInPhoto2011Barbara Borchardt is the creator of ILiveInEastVan, a blog that highlights the art, food, culture, and community of East Vancouver. As a fan of Vancouver Mini Maker Faire, we asked Barbara to partner with us as a Blog Ambassador and she is writing about the awesome Maker community that surrounds our home grounds, the PNE Forum.

Your write about East Van in your blog ILiveInEastVan. What inspires you about this project?
I grew up in East Vancouver and love the culture, community and diversity within this area. I tried on a few different areas of the Lower Mainland in my early 20s, but didn’t find the same sense of community living in other areas. East Van has been considered to be more ‘working class’ and I  have over the years found myself defending East Van as a choice of where to live. I think East Van has so much to offer and is an evolving area. I enjoy showcasing all the things that make it a great place to live and work.

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Meet Your Makers: Heike Kapp, Found-Object Sculptor

Maker Heike Kapp is an artist of the truest sense. If you have been to Vancouver Mini Maker Faire in the past, you might remember her amazing glass marbles. Since then, Heike has shifted focus to her found-object sculptures that incorporate driftwood, photo transfers, flameworked glass and wire-work into what she calls Sea Creatures.  We spoke with Heike about her shift in project, her creative process and how she stays inspired as a Maker.

Photo Credit: Joshua McVeity

Photo Credit: Joshua McVeity

Have you always been a Maker?
I feel I was born a maker. My parents were makers before that was even a term, so I think it’s in my blood. My earliest memory is making a water wheel with my Opa, in the Bavarian Alps, with his trusty Swiss Army knife (which I still own).

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Meet Your Speakers: John Biehler of 3D604

VIA_Biehler_headJohn Biehler bought his first 3D printer after seeing a demonstration on the Colbert Report. Since then he’s founded 3D604, a local 3D printing hobby group that has also acted as an incubator for companies producing 3D printers. He has written books on 3D printing and become an international authority on the topic. Andrew Macquistan spoke to John about the Vancouver 3D-printing scene. We spoke to him about 3D printing and what his group 3D604 will be doing at this year’s Faire.

AM: How did you get into 3D printing?
JB: My origin story — in 2009, I was at South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. Bree Pettis and the MakerBot team brought their prototype 3D printer to an event. That was my first exposure to the technology. The MakerBot was the first machine that was approachable from the average person’s standpoint when it came out. Continue reading

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Meet Your Makers: International Guild of Knot Tyers

CarolMaker Carol Wang of the International Guild of Knot Tyers – Pacific America Branch has been exhibiting at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire since its inception with her wide array of knots. As both tool and art, knot tying is one of humanity’s oldest skills, and Carol shows how it continues to feed, clothe and bind our world.

When did your love of knot tying begin?
When I was 10, I visited family in Taiwan and was given a book on Chinese knots, probably as a way to occupy my time.  This was very successful.

Knots are can be both functional and aesthetically-pleasing. Can you describe the aesthetic styles and where the inspiration for these styles originated?The major decorative style known to the West is probably macramé which developed independently in Egypt, China and Peru.  The word “macramé” is Arabic in origin. Macramé takes a fairly small set of knots and ties them repeatedly in different patterns to give you anything from a friendship bracelet or a plant hanger to baskets or three dimensional sculptures.

The major decorative style known to the East is Chinese knotting.  Stylistically distinct variations have evolved in both Japan and Korea.  Chinese knotting in its basic form takes a single cord to tie one fairly involved knot.  The basic knots can be combined into even more complex compound knots.  Adding more decorative touches in other colours, of course, require more cords.

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